Mother Earth

A work created by Mosaïcultures Internationales de Montréal

“Pacha Mama, our roots lie within you, All our love will triumph over our dismay” (Keny Arkana).

Mother Earth is a tableau that conveys all the beauty and diversity of life. It reconciles man and nature in a masterful and visually spectacular fashion.

The exposition team made Mother Earth spring from the soil to illustrate this passage. From her torso nearly 15 metres tall arise mountains that constitute her hair. Her outstretched arm places some deer down in the midst of a blooming prairie where horses run free and bison are grazing; the latter, though initially destined to extinction, are saved at the eleventh hour by the same man who would have condemned the species to disappear from the face of the planet. From the hands of Mother Earth flows a waterfall and also emerges a Golden Eagle, also predestined to disappear but for man’s intervention.

She goes by many names: “Pachamama” for South American Indians, “Gaia” in Greek mythology, “Terra Mater” in Roman myth, “Mahimata” in Hinduism’s Rig Veda, “Eorban Modor” for the Germanic and Northern peoples, and “Mother Earth” as named and celebrated by North America’s First Nations. She is universal and transcends nationalities and the ages, from the Paleolithic to today. She is the basis for everything: living beings, plant life, minerals, textiles, technology, food.

Mosaicultures Montreal 2013 could have no better ambassador than Mother Earth, the exhibition’s second masterpiece, to set the tone for the event’s key theme, “Land of Hope”, and to illustrate its first sub-theme, The interdependence of man and nature.

Taking its cues from North American Aboriginal culture, Mother Earth was inspired by a speech reportedly delivered in 1854 by Chief Seattle during his meeting with then President of the United States Franklin Pierce on the occasion of the sale of Native land to white settlers. His words capture the essence of the privileged relationship our continent’s first inhabitants maintain with nature.

From that speech, the following excerpts served as the basis for Mother Earth:

“The white man must treat the beasts of this land as his brothers…

We are part of the Earth and it is part of us. The perfumed flowers are our sisters, the deer, the horse, the great eagle, these are our brothers. The rocky crests, the juices in the meadows, the body heat of the pony, and man, all belong to the same family…

This shining water that moves in streams and rivers is not just water but the blood of our ancestors…

The water’s murmur is the voice of my father's father…

The air is precious to the red man, for all things share the same breath - the beast, the tree, man, they all share the same breath…

What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were gone, man would die from a great loneliness of the spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts, soon happens to man…

Preserve the memory of this Earth as we deliver it. And with all your strength, your spirit and your heart, preserve it for your children and love it as God loves us all.”

Mother Earth also draws its inspiration from the Declaration of Interdependence written in 1992 by David Suzuki for the UN Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro that same year.

terre mère

Mother Earth is celebrated by North America’s First Nations. Photo by © Lucie Dumalo

mother earth

Mother Earth is universal and transcends nationalities and the ages, from the Paleolithic to today. Photo by © Lucie Dumalo

mother earth first nations

Mother Earth is the basis for everything: living beings, plant life, minerals, textiles, technology, food. Image: © Lucie Dumalo

mother earth

The Mosaicultures International could have no better ambassador than Mother Earth, the exhibition’s masterpiece, to set the tone for the event’s key theme, “Land of Hope”. Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

oiseau terre mere

From the hands of Mother Earth flows a waterfall and also emerges a Golden Eagle, also predestined to disappear but for man’s intervention. Image: © Lucie Dumalo

chevaux

Horses run free through a blooming prairie. Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

mother earth torso

Mother Earth is a tableau that conveys all the beauty and diversity of life. It reconciles man and nature in a masterful and visually spectacular fashion. Photo: © ProvinceQuebec.com

cerf

From the torso nearly 15 metres tall arise mountains that constitute the hair. Photo: © ProvinceQuebec.com

buffalo

What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were gone, man would die from a great loneliness of the spirit. Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

horses

Preserve the memory of this Earth with all your strength, your spirit and your heart, preserve it for your children and love it as God loves us all. Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

water mother earth

The perfumed flowers are our sisters, the deer, the horse, the great eagle, these are our brothers. The rocky crests, the juices in the meadows, the body heat of the pony, and man, all belong to the same family.  Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

horses

This shining water that moves in streams and rivers is not just water but the blood of our ancestors. The water’s murmur is the voice of my father's father… Photo: © Lucie Dumalo

buffalo legend

The interdependence of man and nature… Taking its cues from North American Aboriginal culture, Mother Earth was inspired by a speech reportedly delivered in 1854 by Chief Seattle during his meeting with then President of the United States Franklin Pierce on the occasion of the sale of Native land to white settlers.  Photo: ProvinceQuebec.com

buffalo head

The following excerpts served as the basis for Mother Earth: “The white man must treat the beasts of this land as his brothers… We are part of the Earth and it is part of us.” Photo: ProvinceQuebec.com

head mother earth

The outstretched arm places some deer down in the midst of a blooming prairie where horses run free and bison are grazing; the latter, though initially destined to extinction, are saved at the eleventh hour by the same man who would have condemned the species to disappear from the face of the planet.  Photo: ProvinceQuebec.com

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