Matagami

The town of Matagami is the western entrance to the James Bay Region.

It was founded in 1963, and it owes its origin to mineral exploration. However, the territory was occupied long before the arrival of the white man. Already in the 17th century, the Cree Nation made the fur trade with the English of the James Bay and the French of Abitibi and Temiscamingue. Today, about 2,000 people live in Matagami.

The town is an ideal place for outdoor activities. Indeed, it is possible to navigate around 4 km of hiking trails located in the forest providing access to an observation tower, the rapids, a terrace, and wildlife diversity. At all. More than 40 km of local trails converge toward the federated path. In Matagami, guests can enjoy a golf course, tennis courts, a campground and the beach. In winter, cross-country skiing will satisfy skiers.

Lovers of hunting and fishing can take advantage of unique sites where the game and fish are plentiful. Those who prefer big game will enjoy themselves in that territory where the big taken are not uncommon.

There are black bear, moose, caribou and other animals there. Small game, represented by different species of hares and partridges, can be hunted. Fishing will bring thrills. Walleye fishing is a real challenge here. It is predominantly found in lakes Matagami, Gull and Olga.

The experience of ice fishing is also unique. Escaping a pike of about fifteen pounds is not unusual. However, hunters and fishers should pay attention to the rules, especially with regard to the dates of opening and closing. Sturgeon and white fish abound in Lake Waswanipi.

Nine major rivers are accessible in a close radius around Matagami.

They provide sufficient space to enable everyone to have a little piece of its own. The town also represents the relay ideal for those who want to go further north, in the land of the caribou.

matagami

Matagami. Image in public domain

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